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The Age of Reason: Europe from the 17th to the Early 19th Centuries, Spring 2011
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This course asks students to consider the ways in which social theorists, institutional reformers, and political revolutionaries in the 17th through 19th centuries seized upon insights developed in the natural sciences and mathematics to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Students study trials, art, literature and music to understand developments in Europe and its colonies in these two centuries. Covers works by Newton, Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, Marx, and Darwin.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ravel, Jeffrey S.
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies
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The African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies is a one credit, year-long elective in which students will consider the scope of African American/Black and Puerto Rican/ Latino contributions to U.S. history, society, economy, and culture. It utilizes Connecticut’s Social Studies Framework themes and inquiry-based approach already familiar to social studies teachers to deliver a content rich and personalized learning experience.The course is an opportunity for students to explore accomplishments, struggles, intersections, perspectives, and collaborations of African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino people in the U.S. Students will examine how historical movements, legislation, and wars affected the citizenship rights of these groups and how they, both separately and together, worked to build U.S. cultural and economic wealth and create more just societies in local, national, and international contexts.Coursework will provide students with tools to identify historic and contemporary tensions around race and difference; map economic and racial disparities over time; strengthen their own identity development; and address bias in their communities. This course will contribute to the critical consciousness and civic-mindedness competencies of a twenty-first century graduate, and ultimately facilitate students’ interest in pursuing further ethnic, anthropology, or human rights studies in the future.

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CT State Department of Education
Date Added:
09/17/2021
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: Black Literacy, Organizations, and  Liberation (1820-1865)
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Developed By:  Dan Broyld and Paquita Jarman-Smith The journey to abolish slavery in the United States was a battle that progressed gradually over time. The unit explores: the individuals, groups, and schools of thought that contributed to the movement. The subsections of the unit will move through the topics of Black survival and resistance to enslavement and emancipation using the Gradualist, Militant, Early and Late Political Periods, and the Civil War. Students will also examine “Free” Black communities, Slave Narratives, Negro Spirituals, folklores, newspapers, pamphlets, and speeches that Blacks and abolitionists employed to precipitate change. Themes of resistance and agency will be examined.In this unit, students will:• Examine how Africans and African descendants worked individually and collectively to spark revolutionary change to their existence; and• Explore various perspectives of enslavement from free and enslaved Africans.Compelling Questions:  When is resistance and/or revolution justified/glorified/condemned?  How effective were the actions of abolitionists and the slave rebellions of this period?  Are individual contributions or collective efforts more effective in actualizing social change?   

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
CT State Department of Education
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: Black Literacy, Organizations, and  Liberation (1820-1865), Lesson 3.1: The Age of Abolition:  The Gradualist Period (1800-1830)
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Big Ideas/Topics to be Addressed, including Key Concepts and Terms Ways slaves resisted Denmark Vesey-Slave Revolt Role of Black Churches in Slave Resistance The Haitian Revolution inspired the abolition movement in the U.S. Role of Abolitionists Black Communities in CT  Black Press Vocabulary:  Slave Resistance, Abolition, Gradualist Period, Negro Spirituals  

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Connecticut Department of Education
Date Added:
09/27/2021
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: Black Literacy, Organizations, and  Liberation (1820-1865), Lesson 3.2: The Militant Period (1830-1840)
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Big Ideas/Topics to be Addressed, including Key Concepts and Terms Nat Turner Underground Railroad Harriet Tubman La Amistad (1839-1841) Vocabulary: Militant, sectionalism, defining race riot  

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Connecticut Department of Education
Date Added:
09/27/2021
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: Black Literacy, Organizations, and  Liberation (1820-1865), Lesson 3.3: The Early and Late Political Periods (1840-1860)
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Big Ideas/Topics to be Addressed, including Key Concepts and Terms Leadership Agent for Change:  Frederick Douglass American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society  Compromise of 1850 & the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850  Bleeding Kansas (1854-1861) Dred Scott Decision (1857) John Brown’s Raid on Harpers Ferry (1859) Artwork: National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; acquired through the generosity of an anonymous donor, 1856

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Connecticut Department of Education
Date Added:
09/27/2021
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: Black Literacy, Organizations, and  Liberation (1820-1865), Lesson 3.4: The Road to Freedom (1861-65)
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Big Ideas/Topics to be Addressed, including Key Concepts and Terms Impact of the Emancipation Proclamation   Role of Black Connecticut soldiers in the Civil War Impact of the Civil War on Blacks in the North and in the South    Reasons for Union victory in the Civil War  

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Connecticut Department of Education
Date Added:
09/27/2021
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: Black Literacy, Organizations, and  Liberation (1820-1865), UNIT 3:  At-A-Glance
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In this unit, students will:• Examine how Africans and African descendants worked individually and collectively to spark revolutionary change to their existence;• Explore various perspectives of enslavement from free and enslaved Africans; and• Analyze the impact of the cotton economy on the development of the domestic slave trade.Compelling Question: When is resistance and/or revolution justified/glorified/condemned? How effective were the actions of abolitionists and the slave rebellions of this period? Are individual contributions or collective efforts more effective in actualizing social change?Pre-Assessment: In what ways have Africans, African Americans, and African descendants persisted past adversity to preserve their own humanity and contribute to the development of American Culture and Innovation? (KWL)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Connecticut Department of Education
Date Added:
10/18/2021
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: Black Movement for Equality (1915-1965)
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Developed By: Meghan Geary, Dr. Stacey Close, and Paquita Jarman-SmithThis unit will focus on Black Americans’ movements for equality, both geographical and societal. It will begin with the ideology of Nadir, which triggered the Great Migration of approximately a half million African Americans from Southern to Northern states between 1916 and 1918, and will then explore the fight for equal rights and the enormous contributions of Black people in America during the early 20th century. The unit should help students understand how the events of the period helped shape present-day systems. Topics include: the impact of Jim Crow laws on Black communities and their resistance; The Harlem Renaissance and African American arts; Black Wall Street and the Tulsa Massacre; African American participation in WWI and WWII; the “Red Summer” of 1919; how FDR’s New Deal Fair Housing Act exacerbated segregation and led to current wealth/wage/opportunity gaps; the establishment of important organizations including the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), The Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), the National Urban League, The Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), The National Council of Negro Women, The Nation of Islam (NOI), The Congress of Racial Equity (CORE), The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC); landmark Supreme Court decisions such as Brown v. BOE; major Civil Rights legislation such as CRA of 1957 and 1964, and the VRA of 1965; Black women’s role in the ongoing revolution; and the contributions of W.E.B. Du Bois, August Wilson, Mary Townsend Seymour, John Lewis, Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune, Constance Baker Motley, Mamie Till and others as detailed in the lessons. In this unit, students will: • Identify tactics, mission, and accomplishments of major groups involved in the movement for equality. • Investigate the causes, consequences, and historical context of key events in this time period. • Evaluate how individuals, groups, and institutions in the United States have both promoted and hindered people’s struggle for freedom, equality, and social justice. • Analyze the role of the federal government in supporting and inhibiting various 20th century civil rights movements. • Analyze the role of women of color in the women’s rights movement.Compelling Question: How successful have Black Americans’ movements for equality been in transforming the dreams, status, and rights of Black Americans in the United States?

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
CT State Department of Education
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: Black Movement for Equality (1915-1965), Lesson 5.1: Great Migration and the “Nadir of Race Relations” and the Juxtaposition of Hope
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Big Ideas/Topics to be Addressed, including Key Concepts and Terms Failed promises of the Reconstruction era created dissonance among Blacks and Whites During the Nadir, in the North as well as the South, whites forced African Americans from skilled occupations like carpentry and unskilled jobs like mail carrier Connecticut and the Great Migration to Hartford Nadir (low point) - the ideology of race relations and underlying social processes Riot vs. massacre: How the narrative is told matters in terms of how the event is received.  “Red Summer 1919” Status of Black soldiers after WWI Black WWI veterans fought abroad as Americans and returned home to be viewed as a “threat” to the status Vocabulary: Great Migration, Juxtaposition, Riot, Tulsa massacre, Black wall Street, Red Summer, Langston Hughes Artwork:  Gelatin silver print of the 1927 Mississippi River flood © 1927 Illinois Central Railroad Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Connecticut Department of Education
Date Added:
09/27/2021
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: Black Movement for Equality (1915-1965), Lesson 5.2: The Power of Black Art: The Empowerment of Black People Through the Arts
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Big Ideas/Topics to be Addressed, including Key Concepts and Terms Harlem Renaissance (early civil rights movement) The New Negro Empowerment of art- keeping hope alive Recognition of Black culture through the Arts (film, literature, art, music, and the media)   Jazz as popular music known as the Jazz Age Vocabulary: Harlem Renaissance, Jazz Age, Jazz, Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Duke Ellington, Bebop, Prohibition, speakeasy Artwork: A program for the Boston Symphony Hall that features Louis Armstrong and Billie Holiday Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture 1947

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Connecticut Department of Education
Date Added:
09/27/2021
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: Black Movement for Equality (1915-1965), Lesson 5.3: Remnants of the Jim Crow South
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Big Ideas/Topics to be Addressed, including Key Concepts and Terms modern-day “de facto” segregation is a result of policies from the early 20th century Redlining prevented Blacks from buying property Vocabulary: de facto segregation, New Deal, FHA-Federal Housing Authority, redlining  

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Connecticut Department of Education
Date Added:
09/27/2021
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: Black Movement for Equality (1915-1965), Lesson 5.4: Resistance and Revolution Through Organized Efforts
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Big Ideas/Topics to be Addressed, including Key Concepts and Terms Organizing to redress racism Systemic Racism Resistance Reform Equity What is Radical? Landmark court rulings changed the trajectory of American race relations forever Vocabulary:  The Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), the National Urban League, The Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), The National Council of Negro Women, The Nation of Islam (NOI), The Congress of Racial Equity (CORE), The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Brown v. BOE, Civil Rights Act 1957, Montgomery Bus Boycott, March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Civil Rights Act 1964, and Voting Right Act 1965 

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Connecticut Department of Education
Date Added:
09/27/2021
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: Black Movement for Equality (1915-1965), Lesson 5.5: World War II - Tuskegee Airmen
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Big Ideas/Topics to be Addressed, including Key Concepts and Terms The fight against fascism abroad and the tremendous contributions of Black servicemen once again ignited the push for justice and equality “at home.” Tuskegee Airmen Lemuel Custis was also Hartford’s first Black police officer Civil Rights Movement benefitting from fight against fascism Vocabulary:  patriotism, heroism, fascism, equality  

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Connecticut Department of Education
Date Added:
09/27/2021
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: Black Movement for Equality (1915-1965), Lesson 5.6:  How The Women Organized and Agitated
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Big Ideas/Topics to be Addressed, including Key Concepts and Terms Civil disobedience vs. civil rights Sit-ins and college organizing such as Freedom Riders and Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) Connection to modern day youth-led movements 

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Connecticut Department of Education
Date Added:
09/28/2021
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: Black Movement for Equality (1915-1965), Lesson 5.7: How The Youth Organized and Agitated
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Big Ideas/Topics to be Addressed, including Key Concepts and Terms Civil disobedience vs. civil rights Sit-ins and college organizing such as Freedom Riders and Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) Connection to modern day youth-led movements 

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Connecticut Department of Education
Date Added:
09/28/2021
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: Black Movement for Equality (1915-1965), UNIT 5: At-A-Glance
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In this unit, students will:• Identify tactics, mission, and accomplishments of major groups involved in the movement for equality• Investigate the causes, consequences, and historical context of key events in this time period• Evaluate how individuals, groups, and institutions in the United States have both promoted and hindered people’s struggle for freedom, equality, and social justice;• Analyze the role of the federal government in supporting and inhibiting various 20th century civil rights movements;• Analyze the role of women of color in the women’s rights movement.Compelling Question: How successful have Black Americans’ movements for equality been in transforming the dreams, status, and rights of Black Americans in the United States?Pre-Assessment: Student Identity: Imagine you are a student during the time period. Describe your school day in a onepage journal entry.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Connecticut Department of Education
Date Added:
10/18/2021
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: How African Americans Persisted: Slavery  and Freedom Stories of Resistance and Agency  (1619 to 1819)
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Developed By: Dennis Culliton and Paquita Jarman-Smith Soon after the settlement of New England, slavery, first Indigenous and then African, became a way to support the export driven economy of the region. This unit will focus on slavery in Connecticut, the U.S., sources of that history, and how we can use analytical lenses to interpret the evidence and tell the story of local slavery and the individuals held in captivity. Themes of resistance and agency will be explored. In this unit students will: • Analyze how Africans, African Americans, and their descendants have struggled to gain freedom, equality, and social justice. • Explore the ways in which slavery was embedded in culture and legislation. • Investigate how multiple racial and cultural perspectives influence the interpretation of slavery. Compelling Question: How were some Africans from the global diaspora able to assert their agency to resist slavery; why were other Africans unable to do this?

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
World History
Provider:
CT State Department of Education
Connecticut Model African American/Black and Puerto Rican/Latino Course of Studies, Semester 1: How African Americans Persisted: Slavery  and Freedom Stories of Resistance and Agency  (1619 to 1819), Lesson 2.1: Slavery and Freedom in Their Own Words
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Big Ideas/Topics to be Addressed, including Key Concepts and Terms 5 Themes of Slavery© (i.e., Dehumanization, Treatment of Enslaved, Paternalism, Economics, Agency and Resistance) Freedom Artwork: Freed Slave and Equal Rights Advocate, James Mars, 1870; The Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Connecticut Department of Education
Date Added:
09/27/2021