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Advanced Stochastic Processes, Fall 2013
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This class covers the analysis and modeling of stochastic processes. Topics include measure theoretic probability, martingales, filtration, and stopping theorems, elements of large deviations theory, Brownian motion and reflected Brownian motion, stochastic integration and Ito calculus and functional limit theorems. In addition, the class will go over some applications to finance theory, insurance, queueing and inventory models.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Finance
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Gamarnik, David
Date Added:
01/01/2013
Advanced Topics in Real Estate Finance, Spring 2007
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This half-semester course introduces and surveys a selection of cutting-edge topics in the field of real estate finance and investments. The course follows an informal ‰ŰĎseminar‰Ű format to the maximum degree possible, with students expected to take considerable initiative. Lectures and discussions led by the instructors will be supplemented by several guest speakers from the real estate investment industry, who will present perspectives on current trends and important developments in the industry.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Finance
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Geltner, David
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Advanced Urban Public Finance: Collective Action and Provisions of Local Public Goods, Spring 2009
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CC BY-NC-SA
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In analyzing fiscal issues, conventional public finance approaches focus mainly on taxation and public spending. Policymakers and practitioners rarely explore solutions by examining the fundamental problem: the failure of interested parties to act collectively to internalize the positive externalities generated by public goods. Public finance is merely one of many possible institutional arrangements for assigning the rights and responsibilities to public goods consumption. This system is currently under stress because of the financial crisis. The first part of the class will focus on collective action and its connection with local public finance. The second part will explore alternative institutional arrangements for mediating collective action problems associated with the provision of local public goods. The objective of the seminar is to broaden the discussion of local public finance by incorporating collective action problems into the discourse. This inclusion aims at exploring alternative institutional arrangements for financing local public services in the face of severe economic downturn. Applications of emerging ideas to the provision of public health, education, and natural resource conservation will be discussed.

Subject:
Finance
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Hong, Yu-Hung
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Analytics of Finance, Fall 2010
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course covers the key quantitative methods of finance: financial econometrics and statistical inference for financial applications; dynamic optimization; Monte Carlo simulation; stochastic (ItĺŞ) calculus. These techniques, along with their computer implementation, are covered in depth. Application areas include portfolio management, risk management, derivatives, and proprietary trading.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Finance
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kogan, Leonid
Date Added:
01/01/2009
Applied Economics for Managers, Summer 2004
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Develops facility with concepts, language, and analytical tools of economics. Covers microeconomics, macroeconomics, and international trade and payments. Emphasizes integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing US and international business environments. Restricted to Sloan Fellows. The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses -- or allocations -- of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Finance
Management
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Richards, Daniel
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Applied Finite Mathematics
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CC BY
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Applied Finite Mathematics covers topics including linear equations, matrices, linear programming, the mathematics of finance, sets and counting, probability, Markov chains, and game theory. Endorsed by CollegeOpenTextbooks.org.

Subject:
Finance
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
Connexions
Author:
Rupinder Sekhon
Date Added:
07/07/2021
Business Analysis Using Financial Statements, Spring 2003
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Uses a case approach to develop a framework for business analysis. Provides students with tools for business analysis, including strategic, accounting, financial, and prospective analysis. Concepts are then applied to a number of decision-making contexts, such as credit analysis, investor communications, merger analysis, financial policy decisions, and securities analysis. From the Course Description: Course Description The purpose of this class is to advance your understanding of how to use financial information to value and analyze firms. We will apply your economics/accounting/finance skills to problems from today's business news to help us understand what is contained in financial reports, why firms report certain information, and how to be a sophisticated user of this information.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Accounting
Finance
Management
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wysocki, Peter D.
Date Added:
01/01/2003
The Challenge of World Poverty, Spring 2011
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, and are hopeful that economists might have something useful to say about this challenge. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? What is economic life like when living under a dollar per day? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Are famines unavoidable? How can we end child labor - or should we? How do we make schools work for poor citizens? How do we deal with the disease burden? Is micro finance invaluable or overrated? Without property rights, is life destined to be "nasty, brutish and short"? Has globalization been good to the poor? Should we leave economic development to the market? Should we leave economic development to non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? Does foreign aid help or hinder? Where is the best place to intervene?

Subject:
Finance
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Abhijit Banerjee
Esther Duflo
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Connecticut Model Financial Literacy  for Grades 6-8
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Middle School Grade VideoMiddle DEMO VideoEquitable and Inclusive Curriculum  The CSDE believes in providing a set of conditions where learners are repositioned at the center of curricula planning and design. Curricula, from a culturally responsive perspective, require intentional planning for diversity, equity, and inclusion in the development of units and implementation of lessons. It is critical to develop a learning environment that is relevant to and reflective of students’ social, cultural, and linguistic experiences to effectively connect their culturally and community-based knowledge to the class. Begin by connecting what is known about students’ cognitive and interdisciplinary diversity to the learning of the unit. Opposed to starting instructional planning with gaps in students’ knowledge, plan from an asset-based perspective by starting from students’ strengths. In doing so, curricula’s implementation will be grounded in instruction that engages, motivates, and supports the intellectual capacity of all students.Course Description: The  Middle School Course is designed to be an engaging, teacher-led curriculum for grades 6 - 8. From money values to credit, taxes to investing, and interview skills to resumes, the interactive NGPF Middle School Course covers all grade level appropriate topics within personal finance in 9 individual units. The course content aligns to the Middle School Jump$tart National Standards. Upon completion of the course, students will have the ability to:Discuss knowledge, skills, interests, and experience required for different types of jobs.Describe the difference between wages, salaries, commissions, and tips.Understand government-provided services are paid for with taxes.Analyze how people differ in values and attitudes about spending.Share examples of how price, spending choices of others, peer pressure, or advertising influence a purchase decision.Explain the similarities between paying for purchases with cash, checks, and debit cards.Compare the effects of using debit versus credit cards to make purchases.Describe the advantages of saving money in an account at a financial institution rather than keeping the money at home.Explain why people invest money.Identify long-term financial goals that are most likely to be achieved by people who regularly invest their money over many years.Discuss reasons people may prefer to buy something with credit rather than paying cash.Investigate the types of insurance commonly available for people to purchase.Aligned Core Resources:Core resources is a local control decision.  Ensuring alignment of resources to the standards is critical for success. The CSDE has identified Next Generation Personal Finance as a highly aligned core resounce after a rigorous review process. Additional Course Information:  The curriculum is online-based and is best implemented in a classroom where students have 1:1 access to technology. All materials are customizable to help you meet the needs of every student in your classroom. The lessons and activities may be completed in person, remotely, and/or in a hybrid learning environment. The curriculum includes a diagnostic exam and a final exam, as well as one exam per unit for units 2 - 9.ELA/Math Transferable Skills Addressed in the Course: Each Lesson Guide includes a checklist of Math skills (Order of operations, Ratios, Proportions, and Percents, Expressions and Equations, Graphing on a Coordinate Plane, Measures of Central Tendency) and ELA skills (Conduct research to locate information, Write claims with clear reasons and evidence, Understand and summarize key topics from a text or visual, Participate in discussions and state ideas clearly). You will see the checkbox marked at the top of the Lesson Guide for each skill that is addressed in that lesson.

Subject:
Finance
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CT State Department of Education
Date Added:
02/08/2022
Connecticut Model Financial Literacy for Grades 9-12
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Educational Use
Rating
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 High School Courses VideoHIgh School DemoEquitable and Inclusive Curriculum  The CSDE believes in providing a set of conditions where learners are repositioned at the center of curricula planning and design. Curricula, from a culturally responsive perspective, require intentional planning for diversity, equity, and inclusion in the development of units and implementation of lessons. It is critical to develop a learning environment that is relevant to and reflective of students’ social, cultural, and linguistic experiences to effectively connect their culturally and community-based knowledge to the class. Begin by connecting what is known about students’ cognitive and interdisciplinary diversity to the learning of the unit. Opposed to starting instructional planning with gaps in students’ knowledge, plan from an asset-based perspective by starting from students’ strengths. In doing so, curricula’s implementation will be grounded in instruction that engages, motivates, and supports the intellectual capacity of all students.Course Description: The NGPF Semester Course is designed to be an engaging, teacher-led curriculum for grades 9 - 12. This course is perfect for teachers who have an entire semester to teach personal finance concepts. It features lesson plans to meet diverse learning styles; rigorous, engaging activities throughout the term; and a digital format so that content is always up-to-date and accessible. The course content aligns to the National Standards for Personal Financial Education. Upon completion of the course, students will have the ability to:Understand the benefits of participating in employer sponsored retirement savings plans and healthcare savings plans.Identify different types of jobs and careers where wages and salaries depend on a worker’s productivity and skills.Differentiate between gross, net, and taxable income.Calculate the amount of taxes a person is likely to pay.Develop a budget to allocate current income to necessary and desired spending, including estimates for both fixed and variable expenses.Describe how inflation affects purchase decisions and the price of goods and services.Analyze social media marketing and advertising techniques designed to encourage spending.Investigate common types of consumer fraud and unfair or deceptive business practices, including online scams, phone solicitations, and redlining.Compare and contrast the features of mobile payment accounts, cryptocurrency accounts, and checking/savings accounts.Explain how traditional IRAs (individual retirement accounts), Roth IRAs, and education savings accounts provide incentives for people to save.Describe how credit card grace periods, methods of interest calculation, and fees affect borrowing costs.Explain the role the FAFSA plays in applying for college financial aid.Identify scholarships and grants for which they are eligible.Analyze the conditions under which it is appropriate for young adults to have life, health, and disability insurance.Recommend types of insurance needed by people with different characteristics.Aligned Core Resources:Core resources is a local control decision.  Ensuring alignment of resources to the standards is critical for success. The CSDE has identified Next Generation Personal Finance as a highly aligned core resource after a rigorous review process.Additional Course Information: The NGPF Semester Course includes a diagnostic, midterm, and final exam. It also contains 9 unit tests, 1-2 options for alternative summative assignments for each of the 9 units, and a final project. This course is online-based and is best implemented in a classroom where students have 1:1 access to technology. All materials are customizable to help you meet the needs of every student in your classroom. The lessons and activities may be completed in person, remotely, and/or in a hybrid learning environment. For teachers who have a full year to teach personal finance content, see the NGPF Full Year Course

Subject:
Finance
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
CT State Department of Education
Date Added:
02/08/2022